Succession

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Succession is the inheritance of a title. It is triggered when the current holder of a title dies or abdicates. The order of succession depends on the title's succession laws. They also dictate how titles are shared between heirs, if the late ruler had multiple titles.

Heir[edit | edit source]

An heir is any character who stands to inherit a title. The person who inherits the ruler's primary title is called the primary heir. The player heir is the character that you will continue playing as when your current ruler dies. This will be your primary heir as well, unless the primary title will be inherited by a character of another dynasty.

Eligible children[edit | edit source]

The gender law determines which children are eligible. Note that with male preference, all daughters are ineligible as long as any sons exist; vice versa for female preference. Trait bastard.png Bastards cannot inherit unless Trait legitimized bastard.png legitimized. The following traits disinherit as well: Trait bastard founder.png bastard founder, Trait devoted.png devoted, Trait disinherited.png disinherited, Trait eunuch.png eunuch, Trait order member.png order member. Theocratic characters cannot inherit either. Note that except for Trait devoted.png devoted, the progeny of disinherited characters is disqualified as well.

Realm succession[edit | edit source]

The realm succession law determines who will inherit each title without its own succession law.

Single heir[edit | edit source]

Primogeniture[edit | edit source]

Male only primogeniture.png

All titles are inherited by the oldest eligible child. Note that a dead or disinherited child’s progeny takes precedence over younger siblings. If no eligible descendants exist, the ruler's oldest eligible sibling is preferred.[1] If lateral branches provide no candidate, the game moves up to the primary parent* and repeats the aforementioned steps.

*the father if patrilineal marriage, the mother if matrilineal marriage

Ultimogeniture[edit | edit source]

Male preference ultimogeniture.png

All titles are inherited by the youngest eligible child. Note that a dead or disinherited child’s progeny takes precedence over older siblings. If no eligible descendants exist, the ruler's youngest eligible sibling is preferred.[1] If lateral branches provide no candidate, the game moves up to the primary parent* and repeats the aforementioned steps.

*the father if patrilineal marriage, the mother if matrilineal marriage

House seniority[edit | edit source]

Equal house seniority.png

All titles are inherited by the oldest eligible house member. With male preference, younger men take precedence over older women; vice versa for female preference.

Multiple heirs[edit | edit source]

(Regular) partition[edit | edit source]

Female preference partition.png
  1. The oldest child is given the primary title along with the capital and any higher title it belongs to de jure.
  2. All titles, of the same tier as the primary, are distributed in the order they're displayed, with priority given to the oldest child with the fewest titles of that rank. Junior heirs are also given any lower title that's de jure theirs.
  3. All titles, one tier below the previous, are distributed likewise. Children who received titles in the previous step will be excluded; this does not apply to the primary heir. Junior heirs are also given any lower title that's de jure theirs.
  4. The previous step repeats itself till all titles are handed out.

Notes:

  • The primary heir will not inherit the highest title the capital belongs to de jure if said title is equal in rank to the primary.
  • If an eligible child dies but had eligible children of their own, their primary heir will take their place instead.
  • Duchy+ titles do not affect the number of counties one gets.[2]
  • If an heir owns land within a title another heir stands to inherit, they may swap that title for one of equal rank.
  • Junior heirs can and will only be vassalized if their rank is lesser than the primary heir.
  • Titles prior to succession are taken into account as well.
  • See Primogeniture if the ruler's branch is a dead end.

Confederate partition[edit | edit source]

Prior to Partition, new titles, of the same tier as the primary, will be created if enough of their de jure territory is held.

High partition[edit | edit source]

Like Partition, except the primary heir is first given half the titles in each step; the rest gets divided among all junior heirs as usual. If the number of titles is uneven, the primary heir will be given the remainder.

Title specific succession[edit | edit source]

A title succession law can be assigned to individual titles; besides the gender laws, these are all a form of elective succession. Options are restricted to certain ranks, cultures and/or titles.

Claim inheritance[edit | edit source]

The gender law determines which children inherit claims on their parents' titles. Trait bastard.png Bastards, Trait bastard founder.png bastard founders, Trait disinherited.png disinherited kin and Trait eunuch.png eunuchs never receive claims. Eligible children are given pressed claims on titles they did not inherit nor vassalize. If the parent held pressed claims themselves, unpressed claims are inherited in their stead. Unpressed claims cannot be passed down, but will become pressed if used in an inconclusive war. Note that a deceased child's place holder will not receive the claims their parent would have inherited.

  • Male/female only: Only sons/daughters inherit claims.
  • Male/female preference: Both daughters and sons inherit claims.
  • Equal: Both daughters and sons inherit claims.

The faith's view on gender determines which children get implicit claims during their parent's lifetime. Note that a deceased child's place holder will receive implicit claims in their stead, but only if they're of the correct sex.

  • Male dominated: Only sons receive implicit claims.
  • Female dominated: Only daughters receive implicit claims.
  • Equal: Both daughters and sons receive implicit claims.

Notes[edit | edit source]

  • Several cultures can get advanced succession laws early due to their Cultural Innovations.
    • Characters of Czech or Slovien culture can enact the House Seniority law at any Crown Authority due to their Table of Princes Cultural Innovation.
    • Characters of Aragonese, Basque, Catalan and Occitan culture can enact the High Partition Law due to their Visigothic Codes Cultural Innovation; due to the same Innovation, they can also enact the Equal (Cognatic) Law at any Crown Authority.
  • If an unlanded character inherits a duchy+ title, they will automatically usurp a county in their realm, preferably the de jure capital. If no land within the de jure title is held, that title goes to the primary heir instead.
  • With partition succession, the primary heir cannot be granted titles their siblings stand to inherit.
  • Baronies are always inherited by their de jure count if there's no appropriate heir; cities and temples (for faiths with the Theocracy doctrine) are never passed down to their holders' heirs (if any).
  • The primary heir receives all wealth/gold and men-at-arms upon death.
  • Characters with the traits devoted or order member can still inherit claims.
  • Characters with the trait disinherited can still inherit titles from rulers outside their dynasty.
  • The display order of titles in the character screen is decided as follows:
    1. The primary title always comes first.
    2. Higher tier titles come before lower tier titles.
    3. Titles of the same tier are ordered according to how long each title has been in possession, the oldest one coming first.

Tips[edit | edit source]

  • The children of Count-level and above characters will not inherit baronies unless they inherit the county title. Thus, if a player has multiple baronies within their county capital, they will all be inherited by their primary heir. This works especially well if your county capital has at least four baronies, several of which have farmland or floodplains terrain. Counties that meet these criteria include: London, Paris, Cologne, Cordoba, Prague, Rome, Baghdad, and Kiev.
  • Consider granting junior heirs their expected titles in advance: siblings won't get claims on their titles, which reduces the potential for infighting, and allows junior heirs to ally each other. Because children tend to love their parent, they make for reliable vassals, and will probably receive a significant opinion of predecessor bonus towards the main heir upon succession.
  • Focus on the counties within your capital duchy: these are the last to get partitioned. If your junior heirs all (stand to) hold a duchy+ title of their own, your primary heir is guaranteed to keep the land within; likewise for the capital kingdom/empire.
  • It may be preferable to grant junior heirs titles outside the de jure realm: they can be granted independence, which will provide the dynasty with additional renown, even if they swear fealty to another ruler (who's not of your dynasty).
  • If one's faith has the monasticism tenet, characters above the age of 9 can be asked to take the vows: this disqualifies them from inheritance; even married characters can be asked, assuming they're the patriarch/matriarch.
  • The dynasty head may spend renown to disinherit kin.

References[edit | edit source]